SILVERDOCS RX FILM FESTIVAL

July 29, 2019 posted by

He made us aware of the existence of a private charity group in Anhui and that was the key introduction that opened the first doors. How much power do documentary films have to raise awareness of health issues? What was the film’s biggest challenge? His friends were his pigs and chickens. Was it hard to separate making this film with “wanting to help? I’ve encountered this during the making of my other documentaries and Blood is even harder because of the subject matter and all the stigma associated with AIDS.

If you turn away from the telephone poles, you could imagine yourself a century back – a time when disease had the power to strike uncomprehending terror into farming families’ lives. A staggering one billion people do not have access to safe drinking water and millions experience hunger everyday. It was hard to resist intervening, trying to help him directly. How did this challenge differ from your previous films? The films illuminated that nations today face a double jeopardy from both infectious and chronic diseases that have tremendous humanitarian, economic, and national security implications. Furthermore, leadership, education, and investments in global health are powerful currencies for peace. What we could do as filmmakers is lend a hand in dispelling some of the unneeded fear associated with the disease.

A staggering one billion people do not have access to safe drinking water and millions experience hunger everyday. Furthermore, leadership, education, and investments in global health are powerful currencies for peace.

The Blood of Yingzhou District – SILVERDOCS FESTIVAL WINNERS

For silerdocs, I wouldn’t give up certain stories even though I kind of knew they slowed the film down. How did the making of this film affect you personally? Chronic diseases including heart and lung disease, cancer, stroke, diabetes and Alzheimer’s are major feetival and negatively impact the quality of life for people around the world. I’ve encountered this during the making of my other documentaries and Blood is even harder because of the subject matter and all the stigma associated with AIDS.

Directed by Kiri Davis. We are the first generation that has the scientific, technological, and public health advances to look health disparities and preventable diseases in the eye and put an end to needless suffering worldwide.

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The films illuminated that nations today face a double jeopardy from both infectious and chronic diseases which have tremendous humanitarian, economic, and national security implications.

A key advisor was a scholar named Jing Jun, a professor at Tsinghua University.

National health experts, many from Washington DC area organizations including the National Institutes of Health, the National Rehabilitation Hospital, the Global Health Council, Fi,m Washington University, and the Children’s National Medical Center, served as panelists to explore the issues raised by the documentaries and challenged audiences to take action. He has been moved to the home of an elderly couple who lost their two sons and one daughter-in-law to AIDS, and the couple seems to be taking very good care of him.

He will start kindergarten in the fall. How did this challenge differ from your previous films?

In an interconnected global society – 2 million people cross national borders every day – the spread of an infectious illness like avian fl u, the safety of our food and water supply, the impact of tobacco and obesity-related diseases, and the threat of bioterrorism do not respect national boundaries. All we know is that they are no longer facing stigma from the villagers and Nan Nan’s relatives are no longer afraid to be with her. This is where three Huang children, orphaned by AIDS, led filmmaker Ruby Yang to their family home where they found empty medicine bottles, old toys, children’s scribbles on the wall, and the smell of death.

Tobacco festigal obesity prevention, providing access to lifesaving medications, combating hunger, and ensuring safe drinking water would also save millions of lives.

The fourteen-hour train ride from Beijing to the villages of Anhui, in rural China, is a journey back in time: What we could do as filmmakers is lend a hand in dispelling some of the unneeded fear associated with the fiom.

It all affected me greatly and motivated me even more to work on the AIDS awareness campaigns. Among Chinese audiences, there is a hunger for information. Also, maintaining emotional distance was difficult.

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Silverdocs sets slate

Directed by Wojciech Kasperski. Good stories told with information are in great demand. Here a filmmaker could lend a hand – dispel some of the unneeded fears, ease the stigma.

Music Documentary Award This thoughtful documentary from Sweden revisits an episode from the youth of the Rolling Stones and examines its repercussions on those who experienced it. It’s the moonshot of our time.

Silverdocs Documentary Festival () – IMDb

Prevention and public health preparedness are cornerstones to improving global health and decreasing health care costs. After all, our common quest for good health cuts across countries, cultures, language, and politics. The experience of going to Anhui, meeting the children and their extended families, seeing for myself their desolate living conditions, their helplessness and hearing their stories – about selling and receiving tainted blood, the stigma against them.

Despite the mundane daily routine of the hospital, the film captures the hope and innocence of the children in the clinic. The boy’s long silence in the film offers a touching symbol of the voiceless victims of the disease. The power of cinema can educate and activate people to respond to health problems we face in the United States and around the world.

It’s the moonshot of our time. In the Chinese culture, it is difficult to talk openly about one’s personal life. If you turn away from the telephone poles, you could imagine yourself a century back – a time when disease had the power to strike uncomprehending terror into farming families’ lives. We are the first generation that has the scientific, technological, and public health advances to look health disparities and preventable diseases in the eye and put an end to needless suffering worldwide.

His friends were his pigs and chickens. Annually, one in four deaths worldwide are due to infectious illnesses: The stories of the children were heartbreakingly sad.